Internet Marketing & Public Relations for the Arts

lessons for promoting your arts organization on the web.

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Changing Channels: Blogs, Podcasts, RSS, and Online Video
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Blogging for the Arts
RSS: Join a Syndicate
Arts Podcasting
Online Video Content
Promotional Events
 
     
 

RSS: Join a Syndicate

 

RSS stands for Really Simple Syndication (also called Rich Site Summary), and can be used for the publishing of your information to other sites quickly and easily.

For example let's look a news feed that I am consuming on this site.

In the typical scenario of using web feeds, your arts organization publishes a feed link on their site which end users can register with an aggregator program running on their own machines; when instructed, the aggregate asks all the servers in its feed list if they have new content; if so, the aggregate either makes a note of the new content or downloads it. Aggregators can be scheduled to check for new content periodically.

The kinds of content delivered by a web feed are typically HTML (web page content) or links to web pages and other kinds of digital media. Often when websites provide web feeds to notify users of content updates, they only include summaries in the web feed rather than the full content itself.

Compared to websites, web feeds have a few advantages for the user experience:

• Users can be notified of new content without having to actively check for it.
• The information presented to users in an aggregator is typically much simpler than most websites. This spares users the mental effort of navigating complex web pages, each with its own layout.
• Media files can be automatically downloaded without user intervention.

Sharing your Content
In addition to web aggregators that collect headlines, you can share or consume feeds for your own website.  For example, if all of the arts groups in your area submitted their stories to a central website which exported an RSS feed, and then each arts organization consumed that feed on their individual websites, the results would be an up to date listing of arts news shared among the arts community.

By making your information available in an ROSS feed, webmasters (which include MySpace pages, Facebook profiles, Bloggers, Homepage content, etc) can easily add your information by simply dropping in a few lines of code.  What better way to get your performance data out there?!

Increases Traffic
The best part about RSS is that you control your information.  All you are sending is a brief outline of what a user can expect to see when they click on the link your provided.  For example, let us say that you included an RSS feed in the following XML format:

<?xml version="1.0"?>
<rss version="2.0">
  <channel>
    <title>Arts Marketing News</title>
    <link>http://www.prarts.com</link>
    <description>Learn about Internet Marketing for the Arts.</description>
    <language>en-us</language>
    <pubDate>Tue, 10 Jun 2006 04:00:00 GMT</pubDate>
    <lastBuildDate>Tue, 10 Jun 2006 09:41:01 GMT</lastBuildDate>
    <generator>Weblog Editor 2.0</generator>
    <managingEditor>Clee25@fuse.net</managingEditor>
    <webMaster>Clee25@fuse.net</webMaster>

    <item>
      <title>7 Habits of Effective Public Relations Experts</title>
      <link>http://www.prarts.com/Lesson_View.aspx?LessonID=1</link>
      <description>This lesson provides a quick overview of the 7 essential habits needed to be
an effective public relations guru.  Think of them as a basic primer for your PR duties. </description>
      <pubDate>Tue, 03 Jun 2003 09:39:21 GMT</pubDate>
      <guid>http://www.prarts.com/Lesson_View.aspx?LessonID=1</guid>
    </item>
   
    <item>
      <title>Writing Copy that Sells and Gets Published</title>
      <link>http://www.prarts.com/Lesson_View.aspx?LessonID=2</link>
      <description>Encouraging arts patrons to attend your organization is the goal of every Arts Group. Writing effective copy for your ads, brochures, websites, press releases,  and other marketing materials plays a key role in turning potential customers into paying audiences. <description>
      <pubDate>Fri, 30 May 2003 11:06:42 GMT</pubDate>
      <guid>http://www.prarts.com/Lesson_View.aspx?LessonID=2</guid>
    </item>
   
    <item>
      <title>The Top 10 Mistakes of Arts Websites</title>
      <link>http://www.prarts.com/Lesson_View.aspx?LessonID=3</link>
      <description>In today's world, there is nothing more important to public relations then your website.  It is your sounding board that allows you to communicate directly with your patrons--so what is your website saying about you? <description>
      <pubDate>Tue, 27 May 2003 08:37:32 GMT</pubDate>
      <guid>http://www.prarts.com/Lesson_View.aspx?LessonID=3</guid>
    </item>  
     </channel>
</rss>

What the User Views on the website:

7 Habits of Effective Public Relations Experts
This lesson provides a quick overview of the 7 essential habits needed to be an effective public relations guru.  Think of them as a basic primer for your PR duties.

Writing Copy that Sells and Gets Published
Encouraging arts patrons to attend your organization is the goal of every Arts Group. Writing effective copy for your ads, brochures, websites, press releases,  and other marketing materials plays a key role in turning potential customers into paying audiences.

The Top 10 Mistakes of Arts Websites
In today's world, there is nothing more important to public relations then your website.  It is your sounding board that allows you to communicate directly with your patrons--so what is your website saying about you?

As you can see, even though I am sharing my content, if the user wants the full story--they need to click on the link which takes them back to my site.   So the site that is "consuming" gets extra content, and the site that is "feeding" gets the traffic.